Friday, December 7, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: PRO SET

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Friday, December 7, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments


Basketball is a game of high energy, runs and momentum. A team can be winning by 12 points, and in a matter of minutes can be down 5 points, now it’s a ball game with only seconds remaining! Players diving on the floor, fans screaming loud, referees grasp their whistles tighter, and the coaches are trying to use their timeouts wisely. At this moment the team needs something big, a guaranteed made field goal or defensive stop to seal the game. Today I have the perfect playset for this moment which is designed to put your team in a winning position.

I call this play “Pro Set” because many professional teams use misdirection, ball screens, and isolation to get the job done on the offensive end. The play starts with P1 at the top of the key, P2/P3 in each corner, and P4/P5 are on each elbow (free throw line). P1 passes to P5. P4 and P1 set a double pick/screen for P3 to come to the top of the key. P3 continues on for a dribble handoff from P5. After the transaction, P5 cuts opposite to create space. Now P3 dribbles hard at P2, baiting P2’s defender for another handoff. P2 fakes up then cuts backdoor, option 1. If P2 is not open, P3 dribbles to the wing and P5 returns for a ball pick/screen for P3. After pick/screen, P3 comes off hard for an aggressive attack. Options will now be available for P3. Pick and roll with P5, penetrate and kick to P1, short pass to P4 diving to the basket, or an open shot for P3.

Click image below to enlarge


Pro Set is preferably used after a timeout or to start a quarter. This will give the players direct movement and action to execute perfectly.  Ultimately giving the ball to your most effective player, weather it is P3, P2, or P1. Stay tuned for additional professional playsets. 

Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball

Monday, December 3, 2012

'Tis the Season

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Monday, December 3, 2012 | Category: , , , , , , , | 0 comments

When thinking about what I should blog about next I decided to go with the theme of the seasons.  As Thanksgiving just passed and Christmas is just right around the corner I decided to look back and take a moment to be thankful and truly see and appreciate the life I have been fortunate enough to be blessed with.  To start, I have an amazing job that I am thankful for everyday.  Who would ever complain about being able to wear sweatpants and Chucks to work?   Yes there are days that I just want to lay in bed and be lazy, but I think everyone has those moments.  I am fortunate enough to say that I do something that I am truly passionate about as my career.  I get to teach the youth not only basketball but life skills.  Nothing makes me feel better than seeing a player grow in many aspects, on and off the court.  Right there I need to give a giant thanks to all of you out there reading this who has given me the opportunity to train your children.  Without you, I would not have a job (and of course, my boss).

Basketball is not just a sport to me; it is a way of life.  It has taught me so many valuable life lessons.  I have had an amazing playing career that some can only dream about.  I cannot be more grateful for those experiences.  I have learned a ton about myself through basketball.  Who would think that a 28.5 orange ball could take me to where it has?  Something that is so small and simple has changed my life.  Because of basketball, I have made amazing friendships and relationships that will last a lifetime.  I know what it means to take it the next level, how to push through when the going gets rough, what teamwork is, being disciplined, mental toughness, and great time management.  I could go on forever on this part but I will spare you. 

I am thankful for my family and friends who have always been there for me.  My parents did everything they could to help support me with my dreams.  They mean more to me than I could ever say.  They never once shut me down.  They went above and beyond their parental duties to help me follow my dreams.  My dad used to drive me 2 hours each way on Sunday mornings so I could go to shooting coach for a workout at 8 am on his day off, let alone paying the price of the coach.    My parents sacrificed every weekend for my AAU tournaments and driving my teammates and I around.  I am pretty sure I am the only person in my college summer league that had their entire family come to every game (grandparents included).  I owe them the world and thank you could never ever express my gratitude for them. 

Sometimes we tend to let life take us out of our element.  Times can get hard and trying.  But when it gets to be too hard, we need to take a step back and look at everything we have.  I always say the little things mean the most to me in life.  We all need to take a look at those little things that we have and are blessed with them and truly appreciate their value.  You never know when it could all be taken away from you. 

Life is a rollercoaster, and rollercoasters are supposed to be fun.  Enjoy every moment and make the most of those moments.  Learn from the challenging moments; don’t wish they didn’t happen, because they are learning experiences.  Life will never throw anything at you, that you can’t handle.  Accept and embrace challenges, obstacles are just a test of strength.  But most importantly, take time to appreciate what you have and what you have been blessed with.  Give thanks to those who have helped you and take the time to help others. 

In closing, I want to say thank you to all those who have helped me throughout my life and my career.  I would say names but than this blog would go from 1 page long to 200 pages.    I am really appreciative of everyone who has helped me so far and cannot wait to see what the future holds for me.  Thank you to Elite Hoops and everyone who continues to work with us!  ‘Tis the season!

Michelle Manfredi
Elite Hoops Basketball

Friday, November 30, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: FLEX

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Friday, November 30, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

A pick is an action where a stationary offensive player stops a defensive player from defending a player with the ball. Also a pick can help an offensive player get open against a defender. A good pick or screen in the game is worth just as much as a score or assist. NBA’s Kendrick Perkins of the OKC Thunder and Reggie Evans of the Brooklyn Nets are each well known for their ability to contribute to the score without scoring. The Flex Offense is designed to give each offensive player the opportunity to help a teammate get open or score.

To start the Flex Offense, P1 with the ball and P2 (P=Player) are on each elbow extended to the 3 point line at the top of the key. P4 and P5 are on each block, and P3 is in the same side corner as the ball. P1 passes to P2, and then P5 sets a back pick for P3 to cut across the lane. If P3 is not open, P3 will finish the cut at the opposite block. Simultaneously, P4 will cut out to the same side corner. P1 will set a down pick for P5 to replace P1 position. After down pick, P1 will cut out to the same side corner. P2 observes scoring options then passes the ball to P5. Now we have the same action on the opposite side. P3 sets a back pick for P4 to cut across the lane, and then P2 sets a down pick for P3 to replace P2 position. This will be a continuous cycle until a scoring option is available.  

Click image below to enlarge
 
The Flex Offense is perfect to play against aggressive defenses or even lazy defenses. Regardless, to defend this play the defense must work and fight through picks. Offensively, each player must be patient and set good picks resulting in scoring options every time. 

Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball


Friday, November 23, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: ZONE DRIBBLE SERIES

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Friday, November 23, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

Today is Black Friday! On days like today, consumers are aggressive, determined, and focused to get the best deal possible. Basketball teams should have the same mindset. Coaches and players must use the same qualities to be effective on the court.

Another play set to use against a 2-3 Zone is the “Dribble Series”.  Player 1 will be at the top of the key, and players 2/3 will be on each wing. Players 4/5 will be on each side of the block. To start the play, player 1 will dribble to player 3’s position, and player 3 will push to the corner. This indicates which player will run the baseline (player 3). Player 2 will replace player 1 position at the top. Now player 1 will pass to player 3 in the corner a shot if open. Player 5 will post up. If no option is available, player 3 will pass back to player then run the baseline to the opposite corner. When player 1 has the ball, player 4 will flash to the high post. Player 1 passes the ball to player 2, then 2 dribbles back to the original position on the wing and player 1 fills. Now, player 4 posts up and player 5 flashes to the high post. The ball is relayed to player 3 in the corner for option.

Click image below to enlarge

This playset should run continuously until the best option is available. Stay tuned for the secondary option to Dribble Series Zone Offense.


Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball

Friday, November 9, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: ZONE OVERLOAD

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Friday, November 9, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

Coaches and players constantly battle during the game to find the right rhythm and pace. Teams try to disrupt this battle by switching up their offensive and defensive strategies. Zone is a great way to change the rhythm and pace of any game, and today’s blog will feature just that.

To be prepared for a typical 2-3 zone defense, today’s playset is called “Zone Overload”. Player 1 will be at the top of the key, players 2/3 will be on each wing, and players 4/5 will be on each block. The beginning of the play should present a 1-2-2 (players in the gaps of the 2-3 defense). Player 1 and player 3 will pass the ball back and forth; this will notify the team which player will overload. After pass back, player 3 will cut to the opposite block. As player 1 reverses the ball to player 2, player 5 cuts to the same block as player 4. Now player 4 and 5 will set a screen on the zone defender in the corner. Player 3 will pop out to the corner to create an overload. This movement creates a man to man match.  Each player has several different options to create a scoring play.

Click image below to enlarge


Zone Overload should be a continuous play. Player 3 is now the designated baseline runner or overloader. Stay tuned for different options using this playset.

Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

ELITE 21 Day Challenge Update: Week 1

Posted by Lee Miller | Wednesday, November 7, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments



Sample Meals: Monday October 29-Sunday November 4
Below are some of the pictures player and coaches have sent us of their meals during the first week of the ELITE 21 Day Challenge.  Player and coaches must send at least 3 meal pictures to us each day.


After one full week of the ELITE 21 Day Challenge here are the current standings:

Lee Miller of Elite Hoops-0 Strikes
Michelle Manfredi-Elite Hoops-0 Strikes
Nick Wilkerson-Marietta High School-0 Strikes
Drew Dunham-Johnson High School-1 Strike
DJ Bostic-Marietta High School-1 Strike
Turner Barckhoff-Crabapple MS-1 Strike
Turner Barckhoff's breakfast 11/1/12
Brandon Chappell of Elite Hoops-2 Strikes
Grant Bryant-Kell High School-3 Strikes (OUT)
Jarvis Jones-Kell High School-3 Strikes (OUT)
CiCi Buford-GAC School-3 Strikes (OUT)



Drew Dunham's dinner 11/4/12
Grant Bryan't dinner 10/29/12
Lee Miller's dinner 10/30/12
Michelle Manfredi's dinner 11/1/12 


 

Sample Schedules:Monday October 29-Sunday November 4

Below are some of the schedules that players have sent us during the first week of the ELITE 21 Day Challenge.  Player and coaches must send their full next day schedule to us each day.


Nick Wilkerson's Schedule 11/4/12
7:00 wake up, brush teeth (DON’T HAVE SCHOOL)
7:15- 7:35 breakfast (oatmeal, apple, boiled egg)
8:20-8:55 individual workouts outside (ball handling, jump rope, mikan drill)
9:00-10:00 watch film (take notes)
10:00-12:00 get in the shower
12:30-1:00 get ready for practice
1:00-2:00 eat lunch (not sure yet)
2:05-2:20 ride to practice
2:30-4:30 Varsity Practice
5:00-6:00 ride home
6:15-6:45 eat dinner (not sure yet)
7:00-7:30 study for Math quiz Wednesday
7:30-9:00 snack (strawberries)
9:00-9:15 shower, brush teeth
9:45- 10:00 email schedule and meals to EHB (info@elitehoopsbasketball.com)
10:00 pray and go to sleep

CiCi Bufird's Schedule 11/1/12
6:30 -wake up
7- eat breakfast
7:20- drive to doctors 
7:40-8:20- getting physical
8:20-8:50- drive to school
8:50-3- school
12-lunch
3:45-6:15-practice
6:30-8:15-I tutored a girl in math
8:20-8:40-drive home
9-shower
9:45-dinner
10-10:30-wash the dishes
11:00-get in bed



Sample Videos: Monday October 29-Sunday November 4

video
    Video of Nick Wilkerson on treadmill



    Nick Wilkerson performing the Mikan Drill


    Turner Barckhoff performing the Figure 8 Drill.


Sample Game Film Study Notes: Monday October 29-Sunday November 4

Notes from DJ Bostic

Marietta 73 v McEachern 68
Pros
    -We did not let McEachern get into sets
    -We had good help side defense
    -We got a majority of the loose balls
    -We hustled 110%
    -We took and executed on offensive sets
    -We shared the ball and played as a team
    -We made open jump shots

Cons
     -We didn't box out well
     -We gave up too many 2nd chance points
     -We did not protect the ball in the 4th quarter
     -We missed too many FTS
    - We did a poor job closing out on shooters


All contestants who follow all of the ELITE 21 Day Challenge's rules and regulations will receive a dinner at a restaurant of their choice with the Elite Hoops staff.

To follow our contestants as they compete, visit www.EliteHoopsBasketball.com/21DayChallenge or click on their name above as their information becomes available.

Friday, November 2, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: 1-4 HIGH

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Friday, November 2, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

Why reinvent the wheel? Most basketball plays either begin or end the exact same. The coach’s job is to find ways to deceive plays that are ultimately the same play. In today’s blog, the play will begin as a “new” playset but will end as a previous posted playset. See if you can figure it out.

1-4 High is the name of this play. Player 1 has the ball at the top of the key, and players 2-5 are lined up evenly across the free throw line extended. Players 2 and 3 are on each wing, while players 4 and 5 are on each side of the elbow. Player 1 passes the ball to player 4. Once player 4 has the ball, player 2 will cut backdoor for a layup. If denied, player 1 will come for a ball handoff by player 4. Now, players 3 and 5 will set a double screen for player 2 to come off the opposite side. Simultaneously, player 1 will dribble towards the top of the key and player 4 will set a single screen for player 3. At this point the play should start looking familiar. Player 1 passes to player 2 then screens away for player 3. Player 5 will post up on the block and player 4 will flash to the high post.

Click image below to enlarge


Figured it out yet? If you haven’t, the play started as 1-4 High but now has transformed into the previous playset “Stack”. 1-4 High can be used as an entry or a total playset with different options. Stay tuned for my advanced version of 1-4 High.

Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Fundamentals vs. AAU

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Thursday, November 1, 2012 | Category: , , , , , | 0 comments

These days it seems as though AAU has taken over the basketball world.  Everywhere you turn there is a another AAU team, and these teams all start at such a young age.  Every parent wants to have their child involved in AAU at such a young age that they are forgetting about learning the fundamentals.  Fundamentals are an extremely important aspect of basketball. 

One of the things I noticed while coaching college the past 3 years is that our players were lacking these fundamentals.  They would come in with a bad shot, horrendous footwork, or a weak handle.  I didn’t understand why they were lacking such important pieces of the game that I worked on at a young age.  I feel a lot of it is because parents are so worried about AAU at a young age that they are skipping over learning the basics first.  I like to compare it to building a house.  In order for a house to be sturdy and last a long time (without multiple repairs) it needs a great foundation.  The same comes with basketball, in order to be a great player, a solid foundation needs to be laid first. 

Does a great shooter become great by walking in the gym and shooting 3’s for the first shot?  The answer is no, they start in close and work repetitively on their form.  When I say repetitively, I do not mean 20 shots, I am talking about thousands of shots.  From there they have a solid foundation in which they can continue to increase their distance from the basket.  I see so many young kids come in the gym and jack up a 3 as soon as they touch a ball instead of staying close and getting their form down.  It is almost near impossible for an 8 year old to shoot correctly from the 3 point line, they just do not have the strength. 

AAU is a great tool for being recruited, and I am not trying to knock it any way.  I just know that without a solid set of fundamentals first, kids are missing an important aspect to the game.  People pay thousands to play AAU each year, and it starts at such a young age these days, that we are forgetting about the fundamentals.  I did not start to play AAU until I was in 7th grade, and even that was young.  I do not feel it is necessary for 3rd and 4th graders to play AAU.  From what I know, the whole point of AAU is to play on elite teams in which you get noticed by college coaches.  However, no college coaches are interested in recruiting a 3rd grader.  With the amount of AAU teams out there these days, are they even “elite” anymore? 

Everyone wants to be a great player and play at the next level, but are you willing to break down your game and develop the fundamentals first.  Yes, it can be tedious, but fundamentals can go a very long way.  It takes time, effort, and hard work, but in the long run it is worth it.  Like I stated before, build the foundation first and then work from there.  Get the fundamentals down and let the rest of your game develop around those skills.

Michelle Manfredi
Elite Hoops Basketball
  

Monday, October 29, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: SWING

Posted by Brandon Chappell | Monday, October 29, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments


A great team is defined by many different ways such as; pregame preparation, conditioning and fitness program, practice regiment, etc. Offensive and defensive play sets for a team should be versatile with endless possibilities. Today’s play set will help your team with adding versatility. Early offensive or quick hitters are very important to an offense. Scoring the basketball quickly before the defense can set up will improve the speed and balance of the game.

Swing is the name of this transition play. Player 1 has the basketball in the back-court while players 2, 3 and 5 sprint down the court. Player 2 and 3 run to the each corner to extend the defensive match-ups  and player 5 begins to post up on the block. Player 4 will trail the play. Now, player 1 will advance the ball to player 2 (or 3). Player 2 has the ball for 1 of 3 options; shoot if open, pass to player 5 on the post, or wait for backside action. Player 1 and 4 will set a staggered screen for player 3 to come off for a shot or attack. If that option is not there for player 3, the ball will be reserved to player 1.  Player 4 has the option to post up or set a ball screen on the backside.

This Swing play is also good for teams with similar players or players that can play multiple positions.

ELITE 21 Day Challenge

Posted by Lee Miller | | Category: | 0 comments

Starting on Monday, October 29, five of Elite Hoops trainees and three of Elite Hoops coaches will begin the ELITE 21 Day Challenge.  We chose players based upon their effort during our training sessions and their commitment to getting better on the court and in the classroom.

Contestants include: Drew Dunham (Junior) of Johnson High School, Grant Bryant and Jarvis Jones of Kell High School, CiCi Buford (Senior) of Greater Atlanta Christian, DJ Bostic (Junior)and Nick Wilkerson (Junior) of Marietta High School and Turner Barckhoff (7th) of Crabapple Middle School, Michelle Manfredi of Elite Hoops, Brandon Chappell of Elite Hoops and Lee Miller of Elite Hoops.


Dates: Monday October 29-Sunday November 18

Yes's
-31 Minutes of Skill Development 6x/wk
-Eating Only From Our Nutrition Guid
-Studying Game Film 2hrs/wk
-Send Full Detailed Daily Schedule to Elite Hoops
-Weekend Curfew of 11:30p

No's
-Cell Phone Use (Except for Contact with Parents, Coaches, Elite Hoops or in Emergency)
-Social Media
-Email (Except for Contact with Parents, Teacher, Coaches or Elite Hoops)
-Internet Access (Except for Schoolwork)
-Fast Food
-Parties
-TV (Except for Studying Basketball)

All contestants who follow all of the ELITE 21 Day Challenge's rules and regulations will receive a dinner at a restaurant of their choice with the Elite Hoops staff.

To follow our contestants as they compete, visit www.EliteHoopsBasketball.com/21DayChallenge or click on their name above as their information becomes available.


Friday, October 19, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: AMERICA'S PLAY

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Friday, October 19, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

The game of basketball is played with rhythm, passion, and high energy. A team must put together a steady systematic flow to be successful on the court. Plays connect the players, coaches, and trainers effectively to execute a game plan. There are numerous plays and styles of play in basketball, but it is very important for a team to have an identity through plays.
America’s play (Screen the Screener) is one of the most popular and widely used basketball plays for all ages. First, player 1 has the ball at the top of the key while player 2-5 set up in a box set. Players 2 and 3 are on each side of the block and players 4 and 5 are on each side of the elbow. Player 1 dribbles the ball to the right wing. While in progress, player 2 sets a cross screen for player 3 to post up on the right block. Player 1 then has the option to pass to player 3. After player 2 sets the screen, player 4 and 5 sets a screen for player 2 to end up at the top of the key. Player 2 now has the option to shoot the ball.
The reason this play is so successful is because of the constant action between the all the players on offense. The term “screen the screener” is tough to defend because of the help action on each player. The defense must decide to either switch or help on each screen resulting in mismatches and late recovery.
For the second and third option to this play please stay tuned.
Click Image to View Larger


Brandon Chappell
Elite Hoops Basketball

Monday, October 15, 2012

It's All About Heart

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Monday, October 15, 2012 | Category: , , , , , , | 1 comments


We want to coach your game not your heart.  As a coach, one of the most frustrating things is having a talented player that just does not have the heart.  It seems to be more of a consistent thing these days, which can be tiring at times. 

As a player growing up, my parents never had to tell me to go work on my game.  I wanted to work on my game.  I would have my parents move the kitchen table so I could dribble in the kitchen, or help me shovel snow so I could get shots up in the winter.  They never had to force me to go to practice.  I wanted to go.  I had it in my head at a young age that I was going to be a D1 player, and that it was on me to make my dreams come true. 

Of course, everyone has his or her tired days but once you step on the court, it is a different world.  A lot of players seem to bring their troubles from the outside world onto the court.  To me, the court is the one place and time where I can forget everything in the outside world and just focus on my game.  For those 90-150 minutes that I am out there, there is nothing else on my mind.  It is just me and the game that I love.

A lot of players today shut down or give you and attitude when you try to get them to go harder.  Most players seem to take the game for granted.  What they don’t realize is that it is a privilege to be able to compete and that opportunity could be gone at any moment.  You never know when your last time stepping on the court is.  I would give just about anything in my life to lace up my shoes and play in one more game for Niagara or one more game in Germany.  I always preached that to the college players I coached in hopes that they would give their all day in and day out.

When people ask me what my biggest strength and weaknesses are I give the answer, “I have no STOP button.”  It is my strength because I always go hard in the things I am committed to.  I will give my all to the very end and then some.  The reason it is my weakness is because I am unable to stop myself even when I should.  For instance, my pro career was cut short because I refused to stop playing when I was told to give it a break.  I pushed for another 4 months on an injury to finish the season, leading to the end of my playing career. 

Coaches want players that come to practice consistently giving their all.  It is tough to coach players that have no energy or enthusiasm.  Players who work hard are my favorite players.  Our job as a coach is to make you a better player, to give you skills to improve your game, to help to get to the next level, and to help you grow as an individual.  It is not fun to coach players who have no drive or excitement for the game.  We should not have to preach daily to you to work hard and have more passion.  It should be something that you want to do.  Practice and basketball should be fun.  Of course sometimes it is hard, but those are the times that help build your character and show what type of player you really are.  Life isn’t always fair, and it isn’t always easy, but hard work really does pay off.  The more heart and passion you have toward something, whether it be basketball or some other aspect of life, the more you will enjoy it and working for it.  A coach/teacher can give you all the skills, drills, and lessons that you need to succeed, but if your heart is not there, you will not succeed.  Once again… We want to coach your GAME, not your HEART.

Michelle Manfredi
Elite Hoops Basketball

Friday, October 12, 2012

Elite Hoops Basketball Playset: STACK

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Friday, October 12, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments


The game of basketball is played with rhythm, passion, and high energy. A team must put together a steady systematic flow to be successful on the court. Plays connect the players, coaches, and trainers effectively to execute a game plan. There are numerous plays and styles of play in basketball, but it is very important for a team to have an identity through plays.

The play “Stack” is a basic offensive set that can be used for all age groups of basketball. It is called stack because four players stack under the rim to start the play. First, the point guard (1) is at the top of the key while the other for players (2,3,4,5) are outside of the lane line on each block. Player 2 and 5 will be on the right block and player 3 and 4 will be on the left block. Players 4 and 5 will turn and set a screen for players 2 and 3, so each can pop out to the wing position. Next, player 1 will decide which side of the court to pass the ball.  For example player 2 has the ball now. At this time, player 5 will post up on the block. Simultaneously on the opposite side, player 1 will set a screen for player 3, to replace player 1’s position at the top of the key. Also, player 4 will flash to the high post position to give another scoring option.

If player 5 or 4 is not open, player 2 will reverse the ball to the other side of the court relaying the ball to player 3 then to player 1. At this time, player 4 will post on the opposite block while player 5 replaces player 4 at the high post.

This play is meant to run continuously searching for the best option. Keep in mind, the high post (4,5) can also be used as a reverse option. Stay tuned for various counter options to make this play for successful.

Click image to view larger.

Brandon Chappell 
Elite Hoops Basketball

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Expectations of Youth Basketball Coaches

Posted by Lee Miller | Thursday, October 11, 2012 | Category: , , , , , , , | 0 comments

On Saturday November 3, Elite Hoops will be hosting a Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic in Atlanta, that we call the Coaches Clipboard. This specific clinic is for 3rd-8th grade youth coaches who are looking to find the most effective way to teach and train their players. We'll spend 3 hours on Saturday morning discussing expectations we have for coaches and players, the most important skill development drills for your team, as well as offensive sets and defensive strategies that will make your players better. We will also briefly talk about what we think is hurting the game of youth basketball.

One of the main topics we will discuss at the clinic are the Expectations of Youth Coaches.  Elite Hoops has 5 Coaches Expectations that will help make your players better and help make you a more successful coach:

1. Teach Skill Development
2. Communicate Effectively with Your Staff, Team and Parents
3. Organize Workouts and Practices
4. Motivate Your Players and Bring High Energy
5. Prepare Players for their High School Coach

Right now you're probably wanting some more specifics on these Expectations, but you'll have to attend our clinic on November 3 to get that.  I will toss one more thing your way though.  What do you think is the #1 thing hurting youth basketball? No, not AAU or travel ball. It's coaches and parents worried about winning every game at every level.  As Coach John Wooden stated, "Success is a Direct Result in Self Satisfaction in Knowing You Did Your Very Best." When coaches AND parents want to win on the 3rd grade level, they focus more on the score than about their players getting better.  That means teaching a set play as opposed to teaching read and react. When coaches AND parents are stressed about winning their 5th grade weekend AAU tournament, they focus more on the score than about their players getting better That means running a frantic full court defense to speed up the game than on teaching sound man to man defense.

Starting this spring, we will be releasing one skill development video and one set play for FREE each week on our website.  We will also be offering ELITE memberships on our site for players and coaches that are interested in receiving ELITE versions and counters of those weekly drills and plays.

For more information on the clinic or to register click HERE.

Lee Miller
Elite Hoops
National Director
"Release Your Potential"


Friday, September 14, 2012

1st Summer with Nike Basketball Camps

Posted by Michelle Manfredi | Friday, September 14, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments



When I took this job in April I knew that part of my job requirements would be directing summer camps for Nike/Elite Camps.  I knew that camps ran from the end of May through August.  I have worked camps since I was in high school so it was not a new thing for me.  However in the past, I was always just a coach at camp.  My duties required me to show up on time, teach the drills I was told, help the players, and simply coach.  It was a good summer job for me.  I never really took the time to think about what it actually takes to plan a camp and direct it.  I definitely realized quickly that I would have my hands full.

What most people do not realize is how much time and planning it takes to ensure a successful camp.  I know I never realized that.  To start, we begin to plan our camps for the following year before the current summer is even over.  First step is deciding on dates and reserving gym space.   We have to choose dates that work with all of the other camps we run throughout the Southeast.  Once our dates and camps are set, then the marketing process begins.  Marketing the camps involves many aspects:  from choosing types of advertisements, colors, sizes, mail or electronic, website advertising, and much more.  Ordering gear for camp is another big part that is overlooked.  You have to order gear well in advance before you even know the numbers and sizes.   Prizes, magazines, evaluations, basketballs, lanyards, and certificates are all part of the gear we need to take into account as well.

The next major part of directing a camp is choosing your staff.  It is important to get the right mix of people and personalities to fill all of these spots.  We want the best staff possible to ensure that each camper leaves camp with more knowledge of the game and enjoys camp to the fullest.  Also involved in directing camps is having a camp daily schedule along with staff guides.  Our daily schedule involves each part of camp down to the minute.  The staff guide includes descriptions on each drill the staff will be teaching.

During the camp week the director is constantly running around making sure each drill is run right.  You have to be quick on your feet as well as think quickly.  We like to keep an 8 to 1 ratio at our camps therefore changes need to be made with each roster add or drop.  If we have a walk up sign up on the first day of camp, a change in the roster and groups may need to be made and made quickly.    All of that is just a brief description of the role of a camp director. 

When my boss came to me in early May, he told me had good and bad news for me.  The good news was…I would be directing my first camp this summer on my own, the bad news was… It was the 1st week of camp.  It was a great feeling that he trusted me enough to handle it, but it was also one of the most nervous times of my life.  He prepared me to the max for that week, taught me the ins and outs, and gave me everything needed to be successful.  However, all the preparation in the world does cannot compare to actually being out there and doing it yourself.  Camp went well and I received good feedback from it so I was pleased.  I am sure I made plenty of mistakes, but all I could do is learn from that and apply it to my future camps.

Before I took this job, I never realized how much was really involved in running a successful camp.  It can be very time consuming and stressful at times.  It makes me appreciate the time and effort that everyone put into the camps that I attended when I was young.  I am very excited to keep learning and growing as a coach and camp director and make each summer the best summer of camps to date.


Wednesday, September 12, 2012

What's Your Go To Move?

Posted by Lee Miller | Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

Every player imagines it. Your team's down 1 point. There's 7 seconds left in the game and you are at the top of the 3pt line with the ball in your hands. Obviously in your dreams you hit the shot every time and celebrate with your team in front of 10,000 screaming fans.  My question to you is what move do you make to hit that shot?  Every player, whether point, wing or big, should have a couple of "go to" moves when they must score.

MUST HAVES:
Middle School- Players need 1 go to move
High School- Players need 1 go to move and 1 counter
College/Pro-Players need 2 go to moves and counters for each

NBA GO TO MOVES
Derrick Rose-Push Floater
Chris Paul-Side Hop
James Harden-Extended Scoop
Kevin Durant-Pull Up Jumper

The key to a "go to" move is that even when the defense knows whats coming, you can still beat them with the move to score.  It has to be a move you practice every time you hit the court and have mastered it even against the best defender in your league.

As you can see above from some of the top NBA players, some move are jumpers, some are floaters and some are even a scoop layup.  Nike sometimes refers to them as "Signature Moves" as they are almost as recognizable as the players themselves.

How to Develop a Go To Move
1. Find a move that you are comfortable performing
2. Practice it 100s of times, until you can perform flawlessly everytime
3. Perform that move in practice/in a training session/against a teammate
4. Bring the move into a live game/scrimmage
5. Use the move at the end of a quarter
   and finally
6. Hit a Game Winner with the move


Lee Miller
National Director
Elite Hoops/NIKE Basketball Camps
"Release Your Potential"

Saturday, August 11, 2012

2012 NIKE Camp at Carolina Courts: Championship Friday

Posted by Lee Miller | Saturday, August 11, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

For 3 straight years, we have hosted our Charlotte NIKE Boys Basketball Camp at Carolina Courts and for first time the camp was sold out.  We had out of state players from South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Georgia attending this weeks camp and the competition, energy and enthusiasm grew every single day.

The development of each player throughout the week was tremendous.We had players on all skill levels improving and holding true to their promise to, "get 1% better each day they step on the court." We hope that each camper continues to improve their game by using our LivingByNumbers online training program. To see each campers Living By Numbers scores from the week click HERE.

We had some Living by Number Record Breakers this week.  Players that beat All-Time or Divisional records are below along with their record breaking video and scores.

Connor Meehan-High School Figure 8 Dribble Record-12

JC Tharrington-College Figure 8 Record-32




Braxton McCoy-ALL TIME 2 Ball Power Dribble Record-203


We started Championship Friday with a quick stationary stretch and our floor length open up drills.  We soon followed with our 5on5 semifinals and championships.  After a brief break, we put campers through their final set of Skill Stations, where each coach "tested" them with one of the drills they had performed at that station during the week. After an hour of Skills Stations, the top 3 players in 4 of our Living By Numbers drills competed in the LBN Championships for some Nike prizes.  Our final event of the day, was the 3on3 Cut Throat Championships.  Players competed all week long for a chance to play on the Championship 3on3 goals and many players, their effort really paid off.

We ended camp with our Awards Ceremony.  The players listed below are our Living by Numbers Champions and Individual Award Winners for the 2012 NIKE Elite Hoops Boys Basketball Camp at Blessed Trinity. If you haven't already done so, please make sure to register for FREE online training and drill score tracking at www.MyLivingByNumbers.com.

Mikan Drill

HS: Austin Mauldin-12
College: Caleb Mauldin-17
NBA: Trey Jackson-13





Figure 8

HS: Connor Meehan-31
College: JC Tharrington-34
NBA: Dakari Johnson-30.5





Cone Layups
HS: Drew Patterson-7
College: Daniel Parrish-9
NBA: Cameron Holmes-10





Hot Shot

HS: Connor Meehan-42
College: Joshua Jones-40
NBA: Cameron Holmes-58





Individual Award Winners
High School:
Hustle Award-Michael Parrish and Coaches Award-Connor Meehan
MVP-Drew Patterson
 College:
Coaches Award-Jason Shealy and MVP-JC Tharrington
 NBA:
Hustle Award-Xavier Young
Co-MVPs-Dakari Johnson and Braxton McCoy

For more NIKE Camp pictures visit our Facebook page.

For campers Living by Numbers scores visit our website.

For information on other Elite Hoops NIKE Camps and Skills Clinic check out our Schedule page.

Sunday, August 5, 2012

2012 NIKE Camp at St. Pius: Championship Friday

Posted by Lee Miller | Sunday, August 5, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments

This was our first summer hosting a NIKE Basketball Camp at St Pius X High School and the turnout and excitement was more than we expected.  For 5 days, we pushed 50 campers through skills stations, 5on5 full court games with passing and dribbling rules, Living By Numbers contests and also our competitive 3on3 Cut Throat half court games.  The staff brought a tremendous amount of energy during the week and the campers responded by working extremely hard every day.  The improvement of each camper from Day 1 to Day 5 was very impressive and based upon the effort that was given on Friday, we hope that each camper continues to improve their game by using our LivingByNumbers online training program. To see each campers Living By Numbers scores from the week click HERE.

We had one Living by Numbers Record Breaker this week.  Check out the video below

High School Division Figure 8 Record-Alex Edler-28.5




We started Championship Friday with a quick stationary stretch and our floor length open up drills.  We soon followed with our 5on5 semifinals and championships.  After a brief break, we put campers through their final set of Skill Stations, where each coach "tested" them with one of the drills they had performed at that station during the week. After an hour of Skills Stations, the top 3 players in 4 of our Living By Numbers drills competed in the LBN Championships for some Nike prizes.  Our final event of the day, was the 3on3 Cut Throat Championships.  Players competed all week long for a chance to play on the Championship 3on3 goals and many players, their effort really paid off.

We ended camp with our Awards Ceremony.  The players listed below are our Living by Numbers Champions and Individual Award Winners for the 2012 NIKE Elite Hoops Boys Basketball Camp at Sandy Springs. If you haven't already done so, please make sure to register for FREE online training and drill score tracking at www.MyLivingByNumbers.com.

Mikan Drill
HS: Trey Morse-8
College: Isaiah Parks-11
NBA: Jakob Spitzer-13

Figure 8
HS: Alex Edler-29.5  
College: DaMarcus Miller-29
NBA: Jonathan King-34

Cone Layups
HS: Alex Edler-7
College: Daniel Stern-7
NBA: Aab Gruduah-8

Hot Shot
HS: Alex Edler-36
College: Jeffrey Blake-32
NBA: Andrew Robertson-30

Individual Award Winners
High School:
Coaches Award-Micah White and MVP-Alex Edler


College:
Coaches Award-Will Gamson and MVP-Jeffrey Blake


NBA:
Hustle Award-Bobby Milewski and MVP-Carrington Braithwaite


For more NIKE Camp pictures visit our Facebook page.

For campers Living by Numbers scores visit our website.

For information on other Elite Hoops NIKE Camps and Skills Clinic check out our Schedule page.

Sunday, July 29, 2012

Day 5: Championship Friday at NIKE Camp St. Francis

Posted by Chris Langley | Sunday, July 29, 2012 | Category: | 0 comments



Championship Friday was an exciting day for all NIKE Camp Coaches and players at St. Francis High School! The 60+ campers knew that they would have to perform at their highest level to meet the expectation of parents, friends and family in attendance, and this hard working group of campers did not let themselves or their families down!

The morning started out with players receiving their NIKE camp t-shirts. After a quick camp photo, campers were then led in a quick stationary stretch and warm-up where the players got their minds and bodies warmed up for the skills stations to follow. After warming up, the players headed into a gauntlet of 8 Skills Stations for the last time. The campers all worked extremely hard during Skills Stations and were reminded to "not mistake activity for achievement," as they were "tested" on all the skill that they were taught in stations throughout the week! Our goal for players during the week is to get 1% better each day. Although that may not seem like much, if each player can commit to getting 1% better each day they step on the floor, then they will become much better players.

Next, players participated in their 5 on 5 Championship games. After some exciting action and some upsets, taking home the championship this week were the Celtics, of the NBA division, UGA, of the College Division, and Blessed Trinity, of the High School Division. Great job guys! 

Living by Numbers Championships followed the exciting 5 on 5 match-ups. Players from each division competed in the Mikan Drill, Figure 8 No Dribble, Cone Jumpers, and Hot Shot for NIKE prizes! You can check-out the winning players below!

Our 3 on 3 Cut Throat competition was next and the improvement from Monday to Friday was immense. With our strict rules of-calling out your team score, catching in triple threat, making at least 3 passes, screening or cutting after every pass, only having 3 dribbles per catch and yelling "ball, deny or help" on defense-the players showed how they can play team basketball if they work at it.

We ended camp with our Awards Ceremony. The players listed below are our Living by Numbers Champions and Individual Award Winners for the NIKE Elite Hoops Basketball Camp at St. Francis High School. If you haven't already done so, please make sure to register for FREE online training and drill score tracking at www.MyLivingByNumbers.com.

Mikan Drill
HS: Harrison Goldstein
College: Charlie Goldstein
NBA: Will Richter

Figure 8
HS: Will Petit
College: Donaven Hairston
NBA: Evan Miller

Cone Layups
HS: Roi Behar
College: Alex Borsuk
NBA: Dash Hairston

Hot Shot
HS: Jared Berenthal
College: Charlie Goldstein
NBA: Paris Williams

Individual Award Winners:
High School Division
Most Complete Player- Will Petit
Coaches Award- Jared Berenthal

College Division
Most Complete Player- Donaven Hairston
Coaches Award- John Sexton

NBA Division
Coaches Award- Ryan Field
Knight Award- Ali Fazal































































To check out more of this weeks action visit us on Facebook!

To sign-up for your Living by Numbers, visit MyLivingByNumbers.com!

To view our schedule for Sunday Skills Training, visit EliteHoopsBasketball.com!